Allen Nance

8 Dimensions of Leadership

8 Dimensions of Leadership – which are you? Ping me and let me know.  Oh, my fault, your first thought was where the “f” has Allen been – no blogging?  Well, true, I haven’t been blogging.  I’ve been working like I bounced a check, and I just haven’t had the mental space and I’ve been fully committed to not blogging crap, so I’ve been saving up some thoughts and ideas to share.

8ldrshipdem

Recently I’ve been studying all the leadership assessment tools, I have been finding myself in more and more situations where I am interacting with team members that I don’t have a 10+ year relationship with.  Actually its been the exact opposite, lots of new team members, lots of new challenges and opportunities, and clearly lots of opportunities for me to be a better leader.  I’ve been looking for a standard assessment tool and framework that we could implement to help facilitate leadership development.  I took 20+ tests, some stupid, some good, but only one that was great.

Why is “8 Dimensions of Leadership” my recommended assessment and book?

- First things first, it says I am “Pioneering” – how the hell could I not pick the one that said I was “Pioneering”.

- It is a “self-assessment” tool and it is a “free”.

- There is a corresponding book that is easy to read, easy to understand, and not full of psychology gibberish.

- The feedback in the book is “actionable” and it provides clear examples.

- Best of all, the feedback focuses on your “blind spots” that you need to work on to be a better leader.

So, what did the assessment and book point me to?  It put me in the “Pioneering” group, with my opposite DiSC being “Humble”.  All the good stuff was the standard: I see opportunity everywhere, blah blah blah, but the real value came from exploring my blind spots and how they effect my ability to be a great leader.  First blind spot or opportunity to get better: more attention to process and planning.  Stop laughing.  The book basically says that I can have a meeting, draw a picture on a white board, snap a photo with my iThingy, and bingo, thats the plan!  What’s the blind spot?  LOL.  Maybe, just maybe, my team members would appreciate just a little bit more detail, process, and a clear path forward (next steps).  My second blind spot is holding people accountable.  This one was surprising, I actually thought I did that; however the more I studied it – I realized: I don’t.  I spend most if not all of my day believing that everyone does what they say they will do, and everyone will just figure out how to get something done, so why would I follow up and close the loop?  I am fully committed to being a great leader, I will continue to leverage my strengths, but I will also focus on my blind spots.

Go take the test and ping me – let me know what you are and what blind spot you are committed to seeing!

4 Comments

  1. Zan Banks says:

    I am glad to see you are back. And I love the fact that whatever you think comes right out of your mouth!

  2. […] Nance put up a post this afternoon on the 8 Dimensions of Leadership. In it, he identifies himself as “Pioneering” whereby two of his top weaknesses are as […]

  3. As you goaded me on Twitter I took this test and came out as Commanding. No big surprise to me. Money quote: “Nothing gives commanding leaders more satisfaction then clearing a path. They tend to be confident and don’t like to watch from the sidelines.”

    While the report did not highlight blind spots I know what they are. I tend to become impatient with slower moving people and often do not clearly explain to them all the steps needed to achieve objectives.

  4. Paul Valcheff says:

    Thanks for sharing, Allen. I came out as “Pioneering”. with a recommended leadership lesson of Chapter 13 “Lessons from Affirming Leaders”…can’t wait to read about it.

    Based on the assessment, though, I can’t see my blind spots.

Leave a Reply

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 147 other subscribers